Mobile menu trigger
en nl de
Account Favorites Bag
Close
en nl de
Account

Food

Food -

Summums Summer recipes: Ceviche & Co

Why eat a hot meal when it’s sizzling outside? This summer, we’re keeping it as cool as possible, with pickled and fermented food and raw chopped ingredients. Three cold dishes that foodies are raving about this year.

 

Ceviche

The Peruvian, “cooked” in citrus juice fish, is the perfect no-nonsense dish for a languid summer’s day. The acids in the juice, usually lime, act on the proteins in the fish and jellify them, as it were. As a result, the fish seems to be cooked but is still very delicate in structure. You mix the juice with finely chopped chilli, a pinch of salt, onion rings and fresh coriander. All you have to do is marinate the raw, chopped fish for ten minutes in the juice mixture. Of course, the fish has to be super fresh. But you can use almost any type, even shrimp or lobster. Most chefs choose a firm, saltwater fish such as sea bass, sole, sea bream or monkfish. Curious to try it? Google Martin Morales. This London-based Peruvian chef is a ceviche ambassador and has a YouTube channel full of recipes.

Fermented vegetables

Fermenting is back and was actually never really gone. In the past, fermentation was used to preserve food. Sauerkraut is one example, as well as yoghurt, pickles and kimchi. But you can also ferment Brussels sprouts. How is it done? Sandor Katz, self-confessed fermentation fetishist, puts it simply: “Chop, salt, pack and wait.” You place your chopped cabbage in a preserving jar with salt, seal it, and while you’re outside enjoying the sunshine, all kinds of good bacteria go to work. Cabbage and other vegetables and fruit contain lactic acid bacteria that flourish in the absence of oxygen. They destroy the bad guys that cause spoilage and end up alone with their favourite food: plant sugars. So fermented products just get more and more yummy. Katz wrote a book about it, called The Art of Fermentation.

 

Steak tartare

Summer outdoors: that calls for the finest raw meat dish there is. And you don’t have to sweat it either: it doesn’t get much easier than this. Just like ceviche, it’s the quality of the ingredients that makes or breaks a steak tartare, but so long as that’s taken care of, it’s just a matter of chopping and mixing. There are a lot of wild claims made when it comes to the origin of this dish, but what we do know is that it hails from luxury Parisian hotels from around the turn of the last century. It was called “beefsteak à l’Americaine”. Take the best steak you can find, chop it finely and add finely chopped cornichons, a shallot, capers, a raw egg yolk, Dijon mustard, salt and pepper and finish with a few drops of Tabasco and Worcestershire sauce. What is the coolest thing of all about this dish? Men love to make it and women love to eat it – on the balcony, with a view over the city.

 

You may also like

Food -

Best for brunch

Why eat a hot meal when it’s sizzling outside? This summer, we’re keeping it as cool as possible, with pickled and fermented food and raw chopped ingredients. Three cold dishes that foodies are raving about this year.   Ceviche The Peruvian, “cooked” in citrus juice fish, is the perfect no-nonsense dish for a languid summer’s […]

Read more
Back to top